littlelotte: (Lindsay reading)
For the record...I reallyreallyreallyreallyreally love Peter S. Beagle. Really. He wrote The Last Unicorn (which is even more wonderful than the movie that I grew up with and adore so much), and I'm nearly finished with Tamsin now. Love it SO much. So full of wonderful fantastical creatures like boggarts and pookas and billy-blinds and really really well-written *sighs contently* I was up way too late reading last night, and then there was a minor disaster in our bathroom at 2am...and I don't even know what caused it. I just know all of a sudden I was awake and thought that Molly had turned a faucet in the tub on (she does stuff like that), but it was really something leaking into our bathroom from, I think, above (there's no watermarks on the ceiling, though) that created a huge puddle/mess. Dan has to get in touch with our maintenance guy today while I'm at work.

Okay, okay...off to work now :-P
littlelotte: (Lindsay mask)
Oh...my... http://community.livejournal.com/waitingtables/747671.html Some very amusing things in there, and testament to what working too much can do to a person.

I just finished Tam Lin! Oh how lovely, though I have to admit I was hoping for a less fantastical explanation after such a perfectly normal book...lol For those of you wondering, I did know the ballad previous to reading the book. I've loved the ballad since near the end of high school, actually, but never heard it put to music or anything. I've actually tried to find a particular version that [livejournal.com profile] a_treitell has spoken of on many occasions, but never to any success.

This book really reminded me so much of college...so much. I want Andrea (my roommate for the first two years) to read it and attest to that, too, actually. Near the end, with their Halloween ghost hunt, I was reminded of the ghost in our freshman dorm room--sixth floor Harvey (my personal, two-person, equivalent to fourth floor Ericson, though Jo did live by herself in the suite attached, so it was practically a three-person affair ;-))--and the subsequent informational search we went on. Andrea, Jo, and I spent an entire rainy Saturday in Waldo Library looking through microfiche from the time period that seemed most likely from Andrea's descriptions of having actually seen him on an occasion. We found nothing, and then Jo discovered East Campus and the archives in East Hall thanks to her Speech Path classes (I didn't discover the archives until my historical archaeo class my third year--and by then I had really forgotten the whole thing...I completely forgot about it until I read this book, actually). The best we came up with was a gas leak in our hall back around the seventies, but we had no idea if our floor was a male floor that year, or if the entire hall might have been all-male, and we didn't exactly come up with any actual deaths, either.

I really want to reminisce some more (maybe I'll call Andrea later--I haven't talked to her in quite a while), but I really have to accomplish stuff now.
littlelotte: (Default)
*pouts* I did so want to finish Tam Lin tonight, but it's already past my bedtime (I have to be to work by five tomorrow morning). *sigh* Janet is about to start her...third? year, I think. I just ended chapter 17 or 18--she just picked up a bunch of books thrown out the window by the ghost in the rainstorm.

books...

Jan. 9th, 2007 11:52 pm
littlelotte: (Lindsay reading)
Library day. Finally got Till We Have Faces, as I've been meaning to read it for about three years now. Also got Coraline based on numerous suggestions (wanted to get American Gods, but they didn't have it in, as nearly as many people have told me to read that as Till We Have Faces), a book of Irish legends and stories, and a book of Welsh folktales. I read Mary Zimmerman's Arabian Nights and I was fairly impressed with it, though it didn't hit nearly the same chord that Metamorphoses did. I still have to read her Odyssey.

I started reading a book of Indian stories, but I had to return it. I enjoyed what I read, but I had already rechecked it out once and don't like rechecking books out more than once in a row in case someone else is interested in them. Same goes for the real Arabian Nights first volume. I'll check them out again within the next couple of rounds. I really enjoy the Indian "tale within a tale within a tale" format. Or rather the "tale after tale after tale within a tale" format. The one I read about the king and the corpse actually got a little tedious after a while. I think it was twelve tales within the main one. Don't get me wrong, I enjoyed every one, but I was too anxious to get on with the main story. I really have to acclimate my mind and patience to that format.

I think I'm going to read Coraline first in this batch. In fact, I think I'm going to start it now. Too bad I have to work in nine hours :-P

Also, I won a $30 gift card to Best Buy at the work party Sunday night. I'm going to get Loreena McKennitt's newest album, but I need another recommendation, too.
littlelotte: (Default)
This one's for [livejournal.com profile] realcdaae...

I'm reading the introduction to Tanith Lee's White as Snow with the introduction written by Terri Windling. Windling is mentioning short story adaptations and articles that people who enjoy these sorts of stories may like, and further goes on to mention a few websites worth checking out...

You'll find further information (and book recommendations) on three excellent fairy tale Web sites: Heidi Ann Heiner's "Surlalune Fairy Tale Pages" (members.aol.com/surlalune/frytales/), Kay E. Vandergrift's "Snow White Page" (www.scils.rutgers.edu/special/kay/snowwhite.html), and Christine Daae's "Introduction to Fairy Tales" (www.darkgoddess.com/fairy/).

I loled...and ran immediately to post this ;-)
littlelotte: (Lindsay reading)
I figured out the title of that collection I was trying to remember: Red as Blood: Or, Tales from the Sisters Grimmer, edited by Tanith Lee. Thank you to the one or three people on my flist that recommended Tanith Lee books, because that's how I figured it out. Unfortunately, our library doesn't carry that particular collection, but I did pick up her book White as Snow and am looking forward to it.

A good summary of the stories in Red as Blood: http://www.daughterofthenight.com/tla007.html#A.32
Some great reviews: http://www.amazon.ca/Red-Blood-Tales-Sisters-Grimmer/dp/customer-reviews/0879977906

Now that I've read The Djinn in the Nightengale's Eye (a collection of fairy stories from AS Byatt) I am also on a Byatt/Arabian Nights kick. I went to the library yesterday and picked up the following:

A.S. Byatt, Elementals
A.S. Byatt, The Matisse Stories
A.S. Byatt, The Biographer's Tale
Tanith Lee, White as Snow
Arabian Nights v. 1&2
Tales of India

I discovered that our local library has an amazing collection of fairy tales and the like from across the globe. This was ridicuously exciting to me--especially the anthropologist/archaeologist in me. I don't think there's any better way to learn about the cultures of locales past than through their stories.
littlelotte: (Lindsay reading)
I've gotten back into heavy reading again recently, and I'm looking for specific suggestions: I love fairy tales/adult fairy tales. I adore the Grimm tales, I love Hans Christian Anderson, and I read a fantastic collection a couple of summers ago that I can't, for the life of me, remember the name of. It was all retellings of Grimm fairy tales, but with a seriously gruesome twist to them all. I believe the title was a play on Snow White and Rose Red--Andrea, John lent it to me so you guys might have it. I would be seriously indebted to you if you could find out the name of it for me, as I'd like to buy a copy for myself.

Yesterday I bought a couple of books--one is a collection of adult fairy tales by AS Byatt (I adore her writing, and Possession was one of the most fantastic novels I've ever read) called The Djinn in the Nightengale's Eye, and the other was Nabokov's Pale Fire (as somebody in [livejournal.com profile] bookshare asked me if I'd ever read it since I love HoL, but she felt that she couldn't get into HoL because "she felt like it had already been done before" in Pale Fire). Since I love Nabokov, I decided it should be a worthwhile read. It looks to me like the faux academia is the only similar part of PF and HoL, and plenty of fiction novels are doing/have done that sort of thing, so I doubt I'll see the same thing she did. It looks like KPL has a fair collection of fairy tales/adult fairy tales, so I'm really just looking to see if anybody on my flist has any specific suggestions, as that's what I feel like devouring at the moment. And by "adult" I don't mean sex, I mean "seriously disturbing and certainly not meant for children."

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